In the Media

Research2Reality Interview with Dr. Janet F. Werker
The Director of our Centre, Dr. Janet F. Werker, was recently featured in Research2Reality's online "Meet the Researcher" series. Click here to read the full interview.

Radio Broadcast: Bilingual Babies with Dr. Janet Werker
Roundhouse Radio 98.3FM broadcaster Kirk LaPointe, on the Our City morning show in Vancouver, spoke with Dr. Janet Werker about her recent "Bilingual Babies" public lecture and about multilingual households. Click here to listen to the full interview.

Radio Broadcast: Talking Babies and Language with Psychologist Janet Werker
"Arts on Air" (CiTR radio) broadcaster Ira Nadel was recently joined by Dr. Janet F. Werker to chat about her research on babies, speech, and language as director of UBC’s Infant Studies Centre. Click here to listen to the full interview; click here to read the accompanying article.

UBC Psychology Newsletter: Tomorrow’s Researchers Today
Dr. Janet F. Werker and the Infant Studies Centre were featured in the latest UBC Psychology Newsletter. The article explores the origins of UBC's Early Development Research Group and how children can actively participate in our research from newly born to teenagehood! Click here to read the article.

UBC Psychology News: Dr. Janet Werker Honoured for Research into Children’s Language Acquisition
Janet Werker is the first UBC professor to win the Gold Medal Award, the highest research honour from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Click here to read the full article on UBC Psychology's news page.

Scientific American Video: Chew on This! Babies Need Their Tongues to Tell Sounds Apart
In this "60 Second Science" video clip, Scientific American describes recent findings from the Infant Studies Centre showing that babies use their own tongue movements to better perceive differences in speech sounds. Click here to watch the video, which features an interview with Dr. Alison Bruderer, the researcher who conducted the study at our Centre.

The Naked Scientists Podcast: Babies Use Their Tongues to Listen
Babies use their tongues not just to make sounds but also to help them to listen, scientists from UBC's Infant Studies Centre have shown this week. The discovery is important because it reveals a crucial way in which our speech and language develops. Click here to hear the podcast, which features an interview with the Director of our Centre, Dr. Janet F. Werker.

Scientific American Podcast: Babies Move Tongue to Learn New Tongues
Interview with Dr. Alison Bruderer about her recently published work from our Centre regarding the influence of tongue movement on speech perception. Click here to hear (or read) the full interview.

The Atlantic: Babies Use Their Tongues to Understand Speech
A new study found that when infants can’t move their mouths to mimic sounds, they have a harder time processing them. Click here to read the full article on The Atlantic.

CBC Radio One: Babies Need Free Tongue Movement to Decipher Speech Sounds
Interview with our Centre's Director, Dr. Janet F. Werker, about her recently published work regarding the influence of tongue movement on speech perception. Click here to hear the full interview.

CBC News: Babies Need a Break from Teething Toys to Better Learn Sounds, Study Finds
New research finds that babies need to be able to move their tongues to better understand speech. Click here to read the full article on CBC News.

Psychology Today Blog: How do Bilingual Infants Separate their Languages?
Dr. François Grosjean interviews our Centre's Director, Dr. Janet F. Werker, for his Psychology Today blog: "Life as a Bilingual". Click here to read the full interview.

Time Magazine: The Power of the Bilingual Brain
Learning a second language can produce a nimbler mind. Now some schools are finding new ways to help students tap the benefits. Click here to read the full article, which features research from our Centre.

The Globe and Mail: Bilingual Babies not Overburdened by Demands of Two Languages
Long before they can understand what is being said to them, babies can make strategic use of the sound cues that they hear to distinguish between two languages. Click here to read the full article, which features an interview with Dr. Janet F. Werker, the Director of our Centre, and some of our recently published research.

The New York Times: Hearing Bilingual: How Babies Sort Out Language
As the relatively new science of bilingualism pushes back to the origins of speech and language, scientists are teasing out the earliest differences between brains exposed to one language and brains exposed to two. Click here to read the full article, which features research from our Centre and an interview with our Director, Dr. Janet F. Werker.